new zealand national anthem māori

Along with a country’s flag and its coat of arms, the national anthem is a symbol of national identity that is recognised worldwide. Kia hau te ingoa; The words to ‘God defend New Zealand’ were originally a poem by journalist Thomas Bracken, published in 1876. God defend our free land. ‘God save the Queen’ (or, later, the King) was inherited from Britain when New Zealand became a colony. It has English and Māori lyrics, with slightly different meanings. Kaua mōna whakamā; Āta whakarangona; Gather before you God of Nations at Thy feet, Āta whakarongona; God defend our free land. Both anthems can be performed at the same occasion however God Save The Queen is generally used for … In the 2000s it was common to sing a verse in Māori followed by a verse in English. Ngā tutū a tata mai; Kia tū hei tauira; Asking Thee to bless this place, Unusually, New Zealand has two national anthems. Hear our voices, we entreat, Additionally, there are 33 results for whakarongona against 179 results for whakarangona. (Of nations and of us too)Āta whakarongona; [4] The song became increasingly popular during the early 20th century, and in 1940 the New Zealand government bought the copyright and made it New Zealand's 'national hymn' in time for that year's centennial celebrations. You will hear Māori words — particularly greetings — used by both Māori and non-Māori. Let its good features endure, Guide her in the nations' van, A name and word index to Ngā Mōteatea by R. B. Harlow and A. H. F. Thornton gives 28 results for rangona and none for rongona in the index for general words. Nei ka tono ko ngā hē New Zealand National Anthem Lyrics in Māori. Guide her in the nations' van, Māori, Pākehā

God defend New Zealand. Tōna kaha kia ū; The rights to the musical score passed into the public domain in the 1980s.[6].

Tika rawa, pono pū; Aotearoa, There is some discussion, with no official explanation, of the meaning of "Pacific's triple star". So it was appropriate for Smith to use 'whakarangona'. Legally the two have equal status, but "God Defend New Zealand" is more commonly used. Kaua mōna whakamā; 5. Kia tau tō atawhai; 1. God defend New Zealand. Give us plenty, give us peace, The anthem has five verses, each in English and Māori.

Men of every creed and race, Aua rawa ngā whawhai Manaakitia mai 3. ‘God save the Queen’ (or, later, the King) was inherited from Britain when New Zealand became a colony. 4. Credits: Stretch Productions (stretchproductions.co.nz), Deafradio (deafradio.co.nz). E Ihowā Atua, Kia hua ko te pai; Gather here before Thy face, [7], In 1897, Premier Richard Seddon presented a copy of words and music to Queen Victoria. Lord of battles in Thy might, the national anthem of new Zealand written by Thomas Henry Smith in Maori language. Freedom's ramparts on the sea, ‘God of nations, at thy feet, in the bonds of love we meet …’ Journalist Thomas Bracken’s words to ‘God defend New Zealand’ are familiar to most New Zealanders – as, increasingly, is the Māori version of the anthem. This proved to be a turning point, sparking a national conversation about our cultural identity and the first language of Aotearoa New Zealand. Me aroha noa [12] However, no widely acceptable replacement has been found, and it has not faced major opposition.

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